CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

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ME's Sharma Named ASME Fellow

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By: 

Toby Weber

Pradeep Sharma, chairman of mechanical engineering at the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering, has been named a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Fellow is the highest elected membership level within the ASME. It recognizes individuals for exceptional engineering achievements and contributions to the engineering profession. Only about 3,000 of the ASME’s 120,000 worldwide members have achieved this status.
 
The official citation recognized Sharma for making “outstanding contributions to understanding size-effects of coupled mechanical and physical phenomena in materials, establishing the mechanics theory of flexoelectricity, and elucidating the coupling between quantum mechanical phenomena and elasticity of nanostructures.”

Sharma’s research efforts focus on multi-disciplinary investigations into properties, behavior and performance of materials and systems from the atomistic level to the gross macroscale. His current research topics include nanoscale piezoelectricity and generalized electromechanical couplings; coupling of strain to quantum mechanical behavior of quantum dots; self-assembly of nanostructures; energy storage and nanocapacitors; quantum definition of stress; and surface energy, stress and elasticity.

His most recent work includes co-authoring a paper outlining the first observation of negative quantum capacitance (published in Nature Communications), and a National Science Foundation-funded project studying quantum field induced strain in nanostructures.

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