General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

Grant Seeks to Further Research on Improved Fuel Efficiency and Emissions

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Toby Weber
Grigoriadis
Grigoriadis

With engine emissions requirements as strict as ever and federally mandated fuel economy standards set to rise, the National Science Foundation has awarded professors at the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering $200,000 to further their research on computational models and algorithms to optimize engine performance in both areas.

The three-year grant’s principal investigator is Karolos Grigoriads, professor of mechanical engineering with the Cullen College. Grigoriadis and his collaborators have spent much of the past 20 years developing and refining algorithms for improving engine fuel efficiency and lowering emissions, partnering with companies such as Cummins, Ford and General Motors in the process. In addition to the NSF, their work has received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Army Research Office and many companies in the engine and automotive sector.

The approach these researchers take addresses both the engine itself, as well as the catalyst used to reduce harmful emissions through chemical reactions. “It’s important to have a model of the whole system, the engine and the catalyst,” Grigoriadis said. “We need to understand the input/output behaviors of each individual subsystem and we need mathematical models that describe this behavior. The algorithms are designed based on these models and they adjust and optimize in real time the coupled behavior of the engine and the catalyst.”

Through these algorithms, then, vehicles’ onboard computing systems are able to use engine data (such as load and speed), predict catalyst performance (such as the amount of oxygen in the catalyst at a given moment) and then tweak their combined operation to meet stricter pollution and mileage standards.

Grigoriadis is collaborating on this project with Matthew Franchek, professor of mechanical engineering, as well as Vemuri Balakotaiah, professor and Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Distinguished University Chair in the Cullen College's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Faculty: 

Department: 

Related News Stories

Senior’s Hologram Software Could be Used to Augment Reality

James can manipulate the size and position of a hologram — in this case, a three-dimensional topographic map. Photo courtesy of Evan James

This article was originally published in the Daily Cougar. Please click here to read the article on the Daily Cougar website.

 

Wearing a bulky version of La Forge’s visor from “Star Trek,” a man pinches and pulls the air in front of him; behind the lens of his futuristic goggles, reality is altered.

Hadi Ghasemi Creates New Material, Breaks Limits of Leidenfrost Phenomenon

Breaking limits: Hadi Ghasemi at the controls

UH engineer Hadi Ghasemi, Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering, is set to change history with his invention of a new material that provides efficient heat dissipation at high temperatures and eliminates a 250-year-old scientific event known as the Leidenfrost Phenomenon.

PHOTOS: John Rogers Shares the Future of Soft Electronics for the Human Body at Engineering Rockwell Lecture

Imagine an electronic “tattoo” on your skin that could continuously monitor your health, or tiny, biocompatible sensors that could treat a traumatic brain injury at the site. It may seem like science fiction, or at least a dream of a very distant future – but as John Rogers of Northwestern University explained to the UH community last week, these are both current examples of biocompatible devices that can integrate with the human body.

Upcoming Events / Seminars