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Five NSF Graduate Research Fellowships awarded to UH students, alumna

Five NSF Graduate Research Fellowships awarded to UH students, alumna
From left to right: Cameron Williams, Audrey Cheong, Darren Seibert and Thomas Markovich (Not pictured: Maria Arredondo)

From cognitive neuroscience to theoretical physics, this year’s National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellows from the University of Houston (UH) have their sights set on careers in fields ranging from medicine to energy. Recognizing outstanding students pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines, the three-year fellowships cover tuition and include a $30,000 annual stipend. Darren Seibert, a biomedical engineering major, and Audrey Cheong, an electrical and computer engineering graduate student, received awards this year.

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