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Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
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CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

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UH-led Team Receives $3.1 Million DOE Award to Develop Superconducting Wire for Wind Turbines

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Selva
Selva

The University of Houston will lead a public-private research team that has been awarded $3.1 million by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a low-cost superconducting wire that could be used to power future wind turbines. This support is part of the DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) program, which recently announced it has awarded $156 million to 60 cutting-edge research projects designed to improve how the U.S. produces and uses energy. Venkat “Selva” Selvamanickam, M.D. Anderson Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering, director of the Applied Research Hub of the Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH) and Chief Technology Advisor for SuperPower, will lead the research project.

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