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Akay Delivers Keynote Address at Middle East Conference on Biomedical Engineering

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Toby Weber
Conference Chair Hasan Al-Nashash, professor of electrical and biomedical engineering at American University of Sharjah, recognized Akay for his keynote address and his contributions to the conference.
Conference Chair Hasan Al-Nashash, professor of electrical and biomedical engineering at American University of Sharjah, recognized Akay for his keynote address and his contributions to the conference.
Cullen College Biomedical Engineering Chair Metin Akay greets His Highness Sheikh Dr. Sultan Bin Mohammad Al Qasimi, member of the Supreme Council of United Arab Emirates and ruler of Sharjah, during the Middle East Conference on Biomedical Engineering.
Cullen College Biomedical Engineering Chair Metin Akay greets His Highness Sheikh Dr. Sultan Bin Mohammad Al Qasimi, member of the Supreme Council of United Arab Emirates and ruler of Sharjah, during the Middle East Conference on Biomedical Engineering.

Metin Akay, chair of the Cullen College’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, recently served as a keynote speaker at the first Middle East Conference on Biomedical Engineering.

Held in the emirate of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates, the conference brought together professional engineers, scientists and academics engaged in biomedical engineering research and development. Akay’s presentation, “Global Healthcare Challenges and Opportunities,” covered healthcare systems, financing, delivery and management as well as recent advances in information technologies and their use in diagnosing, treating, and preventing diseases.

Akay also discussed the role biomedical engineers are expected to play in developing novel and affordable medical technology and drugs to solve global healthcare problems, especially in developing countries.

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