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UH Engineering Research Claims Two TxDOT Awards for Innovation

By: 

Brian Allen

Three University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering professors claimed top research innovation awards from the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), the state agency has announced.

Civil and environmental engineering professors Todd Helwig and Reagan Herman collaborated on a project to develop new, more effective and less expensive bridge construction methodology. Their project, Lateral Bracing of Bridge Girders by Permanent Metal Deck forms, was one of seven projects to receive top honors. The research was conducted in part by Ozgur Egilmez, a Ph.D. candidate. 

Electrical and computer engineering professor Richard Liu also received top honors for his research designed to measure the thickness of reinforced concrete pavement. His project, Development of Low Frequency Radar to Measure the Thickness of Steel reinforced Concrete Pavements, offers a non-invasive and less expensive way for the agency to test the quality of Texas roads and highways. 

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