CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

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New Faculty Strengthen Research at UH

Virtual teams, see-through concrete and sickle cell anemia represent just a few of the new areas of research being explored by faculty who joined UH for the 2001-02 academic year. Peter Vekilov, new associate professor of chemical engineering, is featured.

Peter G. Vekilov joins the UH Cullen College of Engineering as an associate professor of chemical engineering. His research includes the control of the polymerization of sickle-cell hemoglobin that he says may lead to a cure for sickle cell anemia. He also studies the thermodynamics of protein in solutions and is working on new techniques to crystallize proteins faster, allowing scientists to study the structure of molecules more closely. View video clip of Vekilov interview (requires Real Player)

Prior to UH, Vekilov was an assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. His most recent honors include the 2001 UAH Foundation Research and Creative Achievement Award and the 1995 International Union of Crystallography Young Scientist Award given at the Sixth International Conference on Crystallization of Biological Macromolecules in Hiroshima, Japan.

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