Faculty Accolades

Research from Akay Lab tops among IEEE popularity

Dr. Yasemin Akay, a member of the Akay Lab biomedical research team.

A research paper earlier this year from the Akay Lab biomedical research team at the University of Houston’s Cullen College of Engineering continues to make an impact, as the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society noted that is the IEEE’s second most popular paper in the IEEE Xplore Digital Library as of mid-September.

NSF Grant Funds Mathematicians, Biomedical Engineer

Sheereen Majd, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, is co-PI on a $481,000 grant to develop a simple, safe and efficient system to deliver macromolecules to a cell’s interior.

Interdisciplinary Research Seeks Direct and Efficient Delivery of Macromolecules to Cells

Mathematicians and biomedical engineers are working to develop a simple, safe and efficient system to deliver macromolecules to a cell’s interior. The work could lead to improved use of macromolecules as therapeutics.

College honors 17 with yearly Faculty and Student Excellence Awards

Dr. David Shattuck of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Dr. Joseph W. Tedesco, Elizabeth D. Rockwell Dean of the UH Cullen College of Engineering, announced that 17 students and faculty members had been selected as recipients in the 2019-2020 Faculty and Student Excellence Awards, which recognize teaching and research achievements.

UH Researcher Developing New Device to Treat Babies with Blood Disorders

Biomedical engineering professor Sergey Shevkoplyas  is using a $1.6 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, to adapt microfluidic technology to enable leukapheresis in babies.

With severe blood disorders, such as leukemia, doctors often rely on leukapheresis, a procedure in which large machines extract whole blood from patients to separate white blood cells from the rest of the blood, which is then returned back to the patient. This procedure is generally used to urgently reduce a dangerously elevated white blood cell count, or to collect various white blood cell subsets for therapeutic purposes. 

UH and Harvard Researchers Join Forces For Usher Syndrome Research

Muna Naash, John S. Dunn Endowed Professor with joint appointments at the UH Cullen College of Engineering and the UH College of Optometry.

NIH-funded project to explore whether gene therapy can correct genetic deafness

A world-renowned authority on genetic mutations associated with hereditary retinal disorders from the University of Houston is working with a researcher from Harvard Medical School specializing in the diseases and disorders of the ear, nose and throat (ENT) to advance research involving gene therapy options that could one day expand treatment of patients suffering from Usher syndrome.

Under the Lens: Link Between Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration are both genetic disorders that can cause loss of vision and neither has a cure.

UH Research Team Examines Eye Disease with $2.5 Million Award

 

Four words you never want to hear from the eye doctor are retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. Both are genetic disorders that can cause loss of vision and neither has a cure. A team of biomedical researchers at the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering is now tackling both eye diseases by exploring a protein in the retina that links them: peripherin2 (prph2).

Testing New Treatment for Epilepsy Patients

Location of the seizure onset zone varies in each patient. The procedure to locate it begins with surgical insertion of electrodes.

Seizure Onset Zone Located Immediately, Dealt With

 

University of Houston associate professor of biomedical engineering Nuri Ince, who pioneered a dramatic decrease in the time it takes to detect the seizure onset zone (SOZ) in the brain, has been awarded $2.3 million by the National Institutes of Health to expand his testing in a large number of adult and pediatric epilepsy cases.

Blood Clotting Proteins Discovered as Biomarkers of Lupus Nephritis

Lupus nephritis is one of the most frequent and severe clinical manifestations of lupus, representing a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Photo courtesy: GettyImages

Finding Could Lead to Better Clinical Disease Monitoring

 

University of Houston researcher Chandra Mohan is reporting in Arthritis Research and Therapy that clotting proteins, both those that promote blood clots (pro-thrombotic) and those that work to dissipate them (thrombolytic), are elevated in the urine of patients who suffer from lupus nephritis (LN).

Research Moves Closer to Brain-Machine Interface Autonomy

By examining the interactions between single-neuron activities and the information flowing to these neurons, biomedical engineering Professor Joe Francis found that a brain-computer interface, a form of artificial intelligence, can sense when its user is expecting a reward. Photo courtesy: GettyImages

Findings Could Help Seamlessly Integrate Prosthetics

 

A University of Houston engineer is reporting in eNeuro that a brain-computer interface, a form of artificial intelligence, can sense when its user is expecting a reward by examining the interactions between single-neuron activities and the information flowing to these neurons, called the local field potential.

Researchers Developing Early Detection, Home Monitoring Tests for Lupus Nephritis

Early detection and monitoring of kidney nephritis, or inflammation, in patients who have Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, known simply as lupus, is under examination at UH. Photo courtesy: GettyImages

Transformative Research Empowering Patients to Monitor Themselves

 

With $5 million in grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), two University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering biomedical researchers are moving the needle on early detection and monitoring of kidney nephritis, or inflammation, in patients who have Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, known simply as lupus.

Understanding Congenital Heart Defects To Prevent Them

Determining how hearts develop in utero is critical to understanding congenital heart defects.

UH Engineer Using Optical Equipment to Watch Heart Develop

 

To understand cardiovascular failures, the leading cause of birth defect-related deaths in infants, UH professor of biomedical engineering Kirill Larin is teaming up with Baylor College of Medicine professor of cellular and molecular physiology Irina Larina on a chicken and egg hunt.

Stool Proteins to Predict Inflammatory Bowel Disease

At left, Chandra Mohan, Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Endowed Professor of biomedical engineering, with graduate student Sanam Soomro

Method Less Invasive, Less Expensive than Colonoscopy

 

University of Houston researcher Chandra Mohan is set to make a breakthrough in predicting and monitoring inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). With $347,490 from the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, he and IBD expert Subra Kugathasan, a gastroenterologist at Emory University, are examining stool protein biomarkers that indicate the disease.

Mission: Possible — Mapping Dangerous Terrain

UH researchers are testing prototypes for the project in Brays Bayou.

UH Engineers Focus on Degradable Reconnaissance Vehicles and Evasive Drone Maneuvers

 

Ensuring military forces have up-to-date information about a potentially hostile region offers obvious advantages, but current methods for doing that – especially along shorelines, where underwater mines and other hazards can pose serious risks – all have drawbacks. It is especially difficult if keeping the technology out of enemy hands is a priority.

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