CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Faculty Accolades

Stool Proteins to Predict Inflammatory Bowel Disease

At left, Chandra Mohan, Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Endowed Professor of biomedical engineering, with graduate student Sanam Soomro

Method Less Invasive, Less Expensive than Colonoscopy

 

University of Houston researcher Chandra Mohan is set to make a breakthrough in predicting and monitoring inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). With $347,490 from the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, he and IBD expert Subra Kugathasan, a gastroenterologist at Emory University, are examining stool protein biomarkers that indicate the disease.

Mission: Possible — Mapping Dangerous Terrain

UH researchers are testing prototypes for the project in Brays Bayou.

UH Engineers Focus on Degradable Reconnaissance Vehicles and Evasive Drone Maneuvers

 

Ensuring military forces have up-to-date information about a potentially hostile region offers obvious advantages, but current methods for doing that – especially along shorelines, where underwater mines and other hazards can pose serious risks – all have drawbacks. It is especially difficult if keeping the technology out of enemy hands is a priority.

NSF CAREER Winner Sheereen Majd to Improve Drug Delivery

Bacteria - Getty Images

UH Engineer Awarded for Developing Ideal Nanosystem for Therapeutic Applications

 

The National Science Foundation has awarded University of Houston biomedical engineer Sheereen Majd the CAREER Award and $500,000 to improve nanoparticle drug delivery. Majd’s research is focused on tailoring nanoparticle drug carriers to target a selected group of cells affected in different diseases while sparing other cells.

Researchers Report Better Way to Create Organic Bioelectronics

This image demonstrates conducting polymer microcups used for organic bioelectronics and drug delivery applications.   Credit: Milad Khorrami & Mohammad Reza Abidian, University of Houston

New Fabrication Technique Allows More Control Over Electrical Properties

With increasing scientific and medical interest in communication with the nervous system, demand is growing for biomedical devices that can better record and stimulate the nervous system, as well as deliver drugs and biomolecules in precise dosages.

Treating Stroke Patients at the Intersection of Nerve and Muscle

With high-density electrodes placed on the arm of grad student Nick Dias, Yingchun Zhang (far right) monitors muscle contractions to pinpoint the neuromuscular junction. Grad student Chuan Zhang, far left, observes.

A UH biomedical engineer is zeroing in on the gap where nerve meets muscle to bring more precise treatment to stroke patients. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded more than $434,000 to Assistant Professor Yingchun Zhang to delve deep into the neuromuscular junction, the connector of the nerve and muscle fiber, to calculate the exact spot to deliver the dose of motion-restoring Botox.

Research Identifies New Blood Biomarkers for Lupus

Biomedical engineers at the UH Cullen College of Engineering have identified several new blood biomarkers that can help to predict which lupus patients will progress towards more severe forms of the disease.

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