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Industry and Academia Meeting at UH for Electromagnetics Conference

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By: 

Toby Weber
Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Ji Chen with an electromagnetic coil designed for for brain stimulation.
Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Ji Chen with an electromagnetic coil designed for brain stimulation.

Electromagnetics experts from around the country will gather at the University of Houston tomorrow to discuss the latest issues and advances in the field of electromagnetic compatibility.

The gathering is hosted by the Center for Electromagnetic Compatibility (CEMC), a partnership of the University of Houston and Missouri University of Science and Technology. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), CEMC is dedicated to solving problems related to unintentional electromagnetic effects, which can impact the performance of electronic devices and even endanger the health of people with implanted medical devices such as pacemakers.

According to Ji Chen, professor of electrical and computer engineering at UH’s Cullen College of Engineering, roughly 50 people are expected to attend the two-day technical conference. In addition to academics from around the country, attendees will include industry researchers from companies such as Apple, IBM, Panasonic and Samsung.

Event Details:

Date & Time:
November 19, 2013 - 7:30am - November 20, 2013 - 5:30pm

Location:
Shamrock Ballroom, Hilton Hotel, University of Houston
4800 Calhoun Road,
Houston, TX

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